Thursday, January 3, 2013

Inside and outside

I was discussing my little style-crisis with a friend of mine, who is generally very chipper and weird and knows me very very well, despite our physical distance.  Daily text volleys, you know.  Anyhoo.  She asked me a question that struck me-

"Well, what do you want your look to express?"

Huh.

.......................................

I have no clue.

I think the "not feeling or expressing emotions" is definitely the root of the "clothes are simply utilitarian objects" problem.  I don't know what I want to express, because I don't actively try to express, well, ANYTHING.

I bet I'm expressing things, I just don't realize it.  It's like my artistic style or writing tone- I don't see it, but everyone else can immediately identify the source.

If you had to dress me, based solely on my ramblings and your knowledge of my job, what would YOU pick?

12 comments:

  1. Wow! I think I would definitely give you a more artsy/bohemian/fun style. Something that contains easy to care for fabrics with lots of options. Deep, midnight blue because it makes me think of you ... maybe because it's the night sky and I always think of bats when I look at the night sky. Casual with a chance of professional. Easy to wash, not too much ironing. Tailored pants in charcoal grey topped with a nice washable silk, midnight blue blouse and tailored, but feminine jacket.

    I can go on and on.

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    1. I'm guessing you're describing my non-work (and therefore non-sappy/filthy/bird-shit-upon) wardrobe? ;)

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    2. Yes. But you know, there are a lot of pretty fabrics that can handle the intensity/abuse of what you do and yet keep their shape and beauty. I find travel knits are super forgiving and easy to care for. I'm always wearing them at Parsons when I know I have a chance of leaning against this or that art project. I've been at Dick's Sporting Goods and some on-line women's sports stores and they have been carrying very pretty cuts and styles with easy to care for fabrics. Maybe this is something that you can add to your work wardrobe? It'll be comfortable, stylish but easy. Know what I mean?

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    3. I prowl REI pretty regularly, and they have some lovely stuff, but it's all just heinously expensive and doesn't really fit me (story of my life). I imagine the solution will be to use those garments as a lookbook, and to frankenstein my own versions. Once I take off my winter weight (ahem), I'm making myself a duct-tape dummy so I can alter things without having to pin my own back. I dream of jackets that come down past my ass...

      Seriously, I was shit on by a bird yesterday. It happens about once every two weeks.

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  2. Long funky tunics or t-shirts and jeggings (easy to squat in, which I imagine you do a lot of - teaching children and all) tucked into your nice Doc boots and topped off with your signature hairstyle. That's what I see you in! :D

    Neon Buddha and Prairie Underground are two brands that come to mind ...

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    1. I'm on the floor more often than not- I won't wear a skirt without leggings.

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  3. It seems to me that you could use two or three Japanese "happy coats" to put over your 'nice' things to protect them from various dirts. Or those long lab coats. Then you could wear good stuff underneath. When I taught kindergarden (you know, those kids who think nothing of wiping their snotty noses on you)I wore happy coats.

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    1. If you could hear the gears turning inside my brain.....

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  4. Your job strikes me as jeans & t shirts or peasant blouse and tiered skirts (in dark colors and jewel tones, of course). Comfy to wear when you're on your feet all day, easy to move in, and can withstand some abuse. Also, easy to mix and match. Quite affordable, compared to some things.

    I do remember you mentioning previously that thrift stores probably wouldn't work for you because you're an unusual size. I would gladly tailor garments for you, or attempt to help your learn, if you like.

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    1. I'm a pretty good tailor (actually, I'm a better patternmaker, but they're all related). My problem is that I'm tall, and nothing is ever long enough- the arms, the legs, the torsos, the rise... an empire waistline on a normal person hits me right about mid-boob, a real waistline hits me like an empire, and a drop waist hits my natural waist. Regular sleeves and legs look like flood pants and 3/4 sleeves. Short dresses are basically tunics. I look like Alice after she grew through the house. This is why I hate shopping- I hate spending money on something that isn't even CLOSE to being flattering. I'm probably going to resort to making up a few basic sorts of patterns, and just having variations on those themes.

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    2. I completely understand your woes with sleeves and the length of pants/skirts. While I'm above average height, but not super tall, I have long limbs (so I also have the flood pants and 3/4 sleeves problem). My torso is average length, but I'm flat-chested AND broad-backed. Throw on top on all that my very round butt and very out of proportion waist, and I experience plenty of problems with RTW of my own. This is largely why I took up sewing.

      I wish you luck in your pattern-making. I find the aforementioned skirts and peasant blouses easier to lengthen (compared to pants or something with princess seams) because they're less fitted. I know Nancy of Nancy's Notions did a book and DVD on altering patterns that I found pretty helpful. I can give you more info on that, if you're interested.

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  5. How about tights, a stretch pencil skirt (american apparel has some good ones) or a stretch jeans skirt, a gorgeous t-shirt (velvet makes cute ones) and some boot? Galoshes in winter. A bombproof kidproof poop-washable outfit. With that new bob it would be adorable.

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